SV650.org - SV650 & Gladius 650 Forum



SV Talk, Tuning & Tweaking Discussion and chat on all topics and technical stuff related to the SV650 and SV1000
Need Help: Try Searching before posting

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 24-10-18, 10:13 AM   #11
Adam Ef
Member
 
Adam Ef's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Bristol
Posts: 313
Default Re: Rear shock on a budget? Better than stock?

+ I'm guessing that progressive or linear spring won't make much difference to me? I'd imagine that linear pecific to me would be better if I get a choice but progressive would be ok?
Adam Ef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-10-18, 10:16 AM   #12
Adam Ef
Member
 
Adam Ef's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Bristol
Posts: 313
Default Re: Rear shock on a budget? Better than stock?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruffy View Post
In the past I've witnessed friends far more skilful than me riding old, stock bikes make fools of others on fancy bikes, too.



This applies to a lot of cycling. I know a couple of riders who can fly up a hill on an old Sturmey 3 speed steel upright bike, leaving all the guys with pro level carbon pushing their bikes behind them.
Adam Ef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-10-18, 11:01 AM   #13
Sir Trev
Member
Mega Poster
 
Sir Trev's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: High Wycombe, where the chair factories used to be
Posts: 1,227
Default Re: Rear shock on a budget? Better than stock?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruffy View Post
Have you stripped and (re)greased the rear linkages recently?

Old shocks tend to lose their damping and go bouncy-bouncy but your description sounds like it's stiffening up, perhaps due to dry bushes beginning to seize? It may only have done 13k miles but it's 10 years since it was put together new, factory assembly lubrication was never generous and rear linkage servicing is often neglected.

Another vote for checking your linkages before you shell out for new parts. I stripped my Curvy's rear links at about eight years old and was amazed at how little grease there was in them. Cleaned and properly lubed the back end was much better afterwards, with the OEM shock still in there. New front springs are usually a better first move to improve comfort and riding as Bibs says, unless your rear shock has developed a fault. If it's not leaking or showing signs of damage then checking your links and bearings first is a good start and will isolate the real issue so you can make a better informed decision on the way forward.
__________________
We are the Goon Squad and we're coming to town, BEEP BEEP!
Sir Trev is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-10-18, 12:16 PM   #14
Bibio
Member
Mega Poster
 
Bibio's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Dreich Fife (its grey and miserable)
Posts: 11,002
Default Re: Rear shock on a budget? Better than stock?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sir Trev View Post
Another vote for checking your linkages before you shell out for new parts. I stripped my Curvy's rear links at about eight years old and was amazed at how little grease there was in them. Cleaned and properly lubed the back end was much better afterwards, with the OEM shock still in there. New front springs are usually a better first move to improve comfort and riding as Bibs says, unless your rear shock has developed a fault. If it's not leaking or showing signs of damage then checking your links and bearings first is a good start and will isolate the real issue so you can make a better informed decision on the way forward.
agreed...

the problems not always what/where you think it is... especially when suspension is concerned.

it takes a good rider to tell exactly what problems they are having with suspension and this is usually gained through knowledge of having good suspension then moving to something with bad suspension. by and large there is nothing wrong with the original shock on the SV unless its past its best.

i would say start with the basics to determine if you NEED to change suspension components. its simple. set the bikes sag up first and ignore any rider sag settings. jump on the bike and note down the rider sag settings. if you fall outwith the recommended rider sag settings then you need to start to change components like springs.

never ever adjust rider sag sizes to compensate. ALWAYS set bike sag and leave it there. the only time you would change this is when occasionally carrying a pillion or loaded up for a trip.

if rider sag settings are wrong then YOU NEED NEW SPRINGS... its that simple. this is also true of fancy expensive suspension as well.
Bibio is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-10-18, 04:33 PM   #15
garynortheast
Member
Mega Poster
 
garynortheast's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Mid Wales
Posts: 1,353
Default Re: Rear shock on a budget? Better than stock?

Several years back for my 2000 curvy, I bought a set of the cheap emulators (Debrix I think) we obtained here on the org as a group buy. I left the original springs in place, sealed up the appropriate holes in the damper tubes with JB Weld, added fresh oil and put them all back together along with a pair of the pre load adjusters from the later version of the curvy. I just guessed at the preload settings and took general advice on the emulator settings from the org (quite possibly Yorkie Chris). The difference it made to the forks was very noticeable. Gone was the pogo effect when the bike was pushed a bit in the corners, and gone was the infamous fork clonk!
Recently I changed the oil and seals in the forks (long overdue!) and gave them a quick inspection while I was at it. I was pleased to see that the JB Weld was still firmly in place. The oil and seal change freshened the feel of the forks quite nicely, so while I was in the mood I checked the static sag. My guesswork from four or five years previously had been good and the static sag was bang on!

Earlier this year I decided that the back end of the bike was starting to feel a bit off. Not surprising I thought as the original shock is still on the bike and I now have just short of 88,000 miles on the clock (69,000 of those are mine since May 2010). I decided that maybe I would take a look at the rear linkage before doing anything else as I have never taken it off and greased it. As I had a spare rear linkage on the bench, purchased from another orger, I cleaned and serviced it, gave it a good greasing, and fitted it. When I took the old linkage off, it was completely seized! Out for a ride with the newly serviced linkage and the original shock - blimey! What a difference. Proper suspension at the back again.

Now, I know that the prevailing opinion is that these shocks are fekked at 20,000 miles, but I can tell you now that mine still functions well enough with my 11st on board to get me around corners at a rapid pace without wallowing, and to cope with some of the poor road surfaces around here without pogoing. I'm not a racing god, but neither am I a particularly slow rider either. I like my corners and have next to no chicken strips left on my tyres.

I've not yet set the static sag on the rear shock. I jacked up the preload a bit last year to help with the extra weight of carrying a pillion here and there, but I'm guessing it's not far out as the back feels good and doesn't sink too far when either of my daughters climbs on the back.

I have no doubt that a 300 rear shock would make a difference, but the bike handles so well currently that I really don't think it would be 300 worth of improvement. I have seen off much more modern and supposedly better suspended bikes around some of the corners here without having to wrestle with mine, and that says to me that there's not a lot wrong with the suspension on my old curvy.

Last edited by garynortheast; 24-10-18 at 04:38 PM.
garynortheast is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-10-18, 06:18 PM   #16
Ruffy
Member
 
Ruffy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: nr. Derby
Posts: 249
Default Re: Rear shock on a budget? Better than stock?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Adam Ef View Post
+ I'm guessing that progressive or linear spring won't make much difference to me? I'd imagine that linear pecific to me would be better if I get a choice but progressive would be ok?
I'm sure either can be made to work. However, general consensus seems to be that if you're going to change them, go linear according to your own weight requirements.
(IMHO, "progressive" is a rather generous term, sounding fancier than it is - they are a deliberate compromise by design to cover a wider range of possible rider sizes.)

Also
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bibio View Post
...
i would say start with the basics to determine if you NEED to change suspension components.
...
I would say this is wise advice.
__________________
Spannering the wife's SV650S K5 in Black
Also overseeing an SV650 curvy, again in Black, for eldest son.
(I've got an old Yamaha TZR250 and FZ600 as projects.)
Ruffy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-10-18, 05:58 PM   #17
Adam Ef
Member
 
Adam Ef's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Bristol
Posts: 313
Default Re: Rear shock on a budget? Better than stock?

As mentioned, I am going to check the bearings and swingarm too when I remove the rear wheel for a new tyre. I might swap out the shock at the same time if it's obvious it needs it. Would be great if it was just the swingarm bearings needed some cleaning and grease though.
Castellated nut tool and Abba stand adpators on order. I'll update with a verdict when done.

Thanks for the advice all.
Adam Ef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-10-18, 07:20 PM   #18
maviczap
Member
Mega Poster
 
maviczap's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 8,891
Default Re: Rear shock on a budget? Better than stock?

I think that's why I found when I swapped shocks, it was night and day, as I replaced all the bearings at the same time.

So when I rode it after the swap everything was perfect.

I know the linkage bearings were goosed, and the swingarm bearings were very dry
__________________
We're riding out tonight to case the promised land
Make everyday count
RIP Reeder - Jolly Green Giant and comedy genius
maviczap is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Stock rear shock lifespan? Adam Ef SV Talk, Tuning & Tweaking 17 20-10-17 07:11 PM
Budget Replacement Shock 2000 SV650SY? VodkabZ SV Talk, Tuning & Tweaking 9 30-03-12 08:50 PM
Like new stock shock off 02 SV 650 - $ 70. Shipped Docsteve For Sale - SV's and SV related items 2 29-08-10 06:25 PM
Extending the stock shock Blue_SV650S SV Talk, Tuning & Tweaking 28 03-11-08 01:50 PM
GSXR rear shock stock spring rates lukemillar Bikes - Talk & Issues 3 07-05-06 01:38 PM


All times are GMT. The time now is 03:00 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® - Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.